Facts about Keepsake Necklaces

Cremation jewelry has evolved and changed several times throughout the years. Originally, it started out as drops of blood of a loved one on pieces of cloth that were kept in a brooch or locket. These relics, as they were once called, have evolved into something much more modern and less macabre to think about. There is no need to keep bits of dried blood to have your loved one near you. Here are some facts about keepsake necklaces that you may not have known before.

Keepsake necklaces are not always something that you fill. Some of them can be similar to a locket or even just a pendant that makes a statement or helps you to remember your loved one by. It could be a breast cancer ribbon, a paw print or even a sports team or other pendant. They do not have to be scary or intimidating to the wearer.

Just because a pendant is designed to be filled, doesn’t mean that you have to fill it with ashes of your loved one. Many people purchase keepsake necklaces for their loved ones when a family member or pet passes on, but they do not always have their loved one cremated. You can fill the pendants with other things such as clippings of hair, a piece of cloth from their favorite piece of clothing or even a toy that they liked best.

Keepsake necklaces are for you. You don’t have to tell people that you have a part of a deceased relative in your necklace unless you want to. Many people still find it odd, to memorialize their loved ones in this way, therefore, not telling someone is completely your decision. If you do decide to tell people why your keepsake necklace means so much to you, that is your choice, otherwise it will remain your secret.

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